Skip to main content

About your Search

20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
rake, only on the money you make on the margin. stephen moore is here from the wall street journal and he's ready to jump out of his skin after i said that. he specializes in telling me why i'm wrong. and our other guest, david johnston wrote "the fine print." stephen, you are our resident anti-tax crusader. i totally agree every penny counts when it comes to your own money. when you compare the taxes most americans paid in past decades i don't get why republicans are screaming bloody murder about this. what would be so bad with the wealthiest among us chipping in a little bit more? i'm emphasizing just a little bit more. >> when you showed that chart of the tax rates that was exactly accurate. we had 70% tax rates in the '70s. that didn't turn out well. then we cut the rates significantly. went down to 50%, 28%. the rates went up to 35%. i would love to see you super impose on that chart the share of taxes paid by the rich. here is the interesting thing. >>> one of the reason the deficit went down is you had a big increase in the number of people making money. they paid more tax.
's christopher lance moore, things didn't go as planned when he allegedly broke into a home in texas. the man holding moore at gun point when he found him at his home. his stepson says moore should be lucky to still be alive. >> it was a bad night probably. he was going to try and run or something and that i was gog have to shoot him or my stepdad would have to shoot him. >> gretchen: so moore now facing burglary charges. brian? >> brian: former republican senator alan simpson can legislate, but i didn't know until now that he can actually dance. ♪ . >> brian: that is fantastic. 81-year-old getting down and drawing attention to the fiscal cliff. he made this as part of a nonpartson group because you can not be partisan and do gangam style. the can kicks back, they're urging young americans to help solve the nation's crisis. simpson was one half of the simpson bowles commission tasked with tackling the debt and deficit. >> gretchen: the reason he didn't kick the can was because he had a plan that you wouldn't have to kick the can. you would actually put our fiscal order better off. speaking
, not so much. bill: some of these warnings now the national debt is nearing dangerous levels. steven moore is here with the "wall street journal." what does it mean that the warnings are there, steve. >> the amazing thing about this debt. i was thinking when i first came to washington which was in the early 1980s, the debt level was about $2.5 trillion. now we are at 16.2 trillion. by the way every president goods back to dwight eisenhower has promised that they will balance the budget and the debt keeps getting bigger and bigger. the real tragedy is that over the last five years the debt has increased by almost $6 trillion. that is more money than was borrowed from 1776 through the year 1976. bill: that's ridiculous. >> it is a tragic situation. bill: what is the danger in this economically speaking for us. >> the danger is two fold. one is if you look at the budget right now and we continue on this pace of borrowing we are expected to do, trillion dollar deficits for as far as the eye can see we are looking at somewhere in the neighborhood of a trillion dollars each year bill in only ser
to the aflac trivia question, julianne moore. that makes sense. the winner katherine savage from san antonio, texas. congratulations. meanwhile, we've become used to the media frenzy surrounding high profile celebrity court cases like casey anthony and o. j. simpson, case where is people follow every move the lawyers make and every word the witnesses say. what about average americans who aren't celebrities, who are facing justice by a jury of their peers? what are those cases really like? our next guest made it his mission to find out. he's spending a year in a small courtroom in new england, joining us, the best selling author of "fatal vision" and other books, joe gothic. >> good morning. >> steve: so 15 gothic street is the street address of the superior court courtroom in massachusetts. >> north hampton. >> steve: so what you decided to do is you were going to spend a year there just watching the everyday stuff that doesn't get the headlines. >> exactly. and write a book in serial form. this is the new approach i'm taking because the old publishing model just doesn't work anymore. and th
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)